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Naval gunfire support NGFS also known as shore bombardment is the use of naval artillery to provide fire support for amphibious assault and other troops operating within their range. Modern naval gunfire support is one of the three main components of amphibious warfare assault operations support, along with aircraft and ship-launched missiles. Shipborne guns have been used against shore defences since the early days of naval warfare.

NGFS is classified into two types: direct fire, where the ship has line of sight with the target either visually or through the use of radar , and indirect fire, which, to be accurate, requires an artillery observer to adjust fire. When on the gunline, ships are particularly vulnerable to attack from aircraft coming from a landward direction and flying low to avoid radar detection, or from submarines due to a predictable and steady non-evasive course.


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They could fire several miles inland against German positions. The practice reached its zenith during World War II , when the availability of man-portable radio systems and sophisticated relay networks allowed forward observers to transmit targeting information and provide almost instant accuracy reports — once troops had landed. Battleships , cruisers and destroyers would pound shore installations, sometimes for days, in the hope of reducing fortifications and attriting defending forces. Obsolete battleships unfit for combat against other ships were often used as floating gun platforms expressly for this purpose.

However, given the relatively primitive nature of the fire control computers and radar of the era combined with the high velocity of naval gunfire, accuracy was poor until troops actually hit the beach and were able to radio back reports to the ship — usually after sustaining heavy casualties.

The solution was to engage in longer and longer bombardment periods — up to two weeks, in some cases— saturating target areas with fire until a lucky few shells had destroyed the intended targets. This had the unfortunate effect of "telegraphing the punch", alerting an enemy that he was about to be attacked.

In the Pacific War , this mattered little, as the defenders were usually expecting their island strongholds to be invaded at some point and had already committed whatever combat resources were available. Bombardment periods were usually shorter in the European theater, where surprise was more often valued, reinforcement far more likely, and ships' guns were responding to the movements of mobile defenders, not whittling away at static fortifications. The heavy-caliber guns of some eighteen battleships and cruisers were used to stop German Panzer counterattack at Salerno. Naval gunfire was also used to help curb German operations in Normandy , although the surprise nature of the attack precluded the drawn-out bombardment which could have reduced the Atlantic Wall defences sufficiently, a process that fell to specialist armoured vehicles instead.

Naval gunfire was also useful in a defensive capacity. Older ships were occasionally beached to provide a coastal defence platform, and during the Battle of France the British discovered effective anti-tank artillery in the form of the four-inch mm guns from destroyers tied up at the quays of Boulogne.

Task Unit If greater firepower was required then larger gunned cruisers were called in for reinforcements. In the actions in Lebanon, fire support was provided on several occasions by destroyers and cruisers assigned to coastal patrol.

USS Agerholm Vietnam 1969 - Gunfire Support

Naval Gunfire is still used for many of its traditional purposes. ANGLICO members are temporarily assigned to combat units of the United States and foreign nations that lack inherent fire support capability, such as naval gunfire. The navies of the world have almost universally moved away from the largest caliber guns of the early and middle of the 20th century because the battleships and large cruisers that carried them have been scrapped.

The aircraft carrier and sea to land missile have proven to be more cost effective. Naval guns used on modern ships tend to be smaller caliber weapons but with more advanced targeting systems. In , therefore, the RN was quite well prepared for this particular aspect of joint warfare. The practice reached its zenith during World War II , when the availability of man-portable radio systems and sophisticated relay networks allowed forward observers to transmit targeting information and provide almost instant accuracy reports—once troops had landed.

Battleships , cruisers and destroyers would pound shore installations, sometimes for days, in the hope of reducing fortifications and attriting defending forces. Obsolete battleships unfit for combat against other ships were often used as floating gun platforms expressly for this purpose.

However, given the relatively primitive nature of the fire control computers and radar of the era combined with the high velocity of naval gunfire, accuracy depended upon designated observer aircraft until troops landed and were able to radio back reports to the ship. The solution was to engage in longer bombardment periods—up to two weeks, in some cases—saturating target areas with fire until a lucky few shells had destroyed the intended targets.

This alerted an enemy that he was about to be attacked. In the Pacific War this mattered less, as the defenders were usually expecting their island strongholds to be invaded at some point and had already committed whatever combat resources were available. Bombardment periods were usually shorter in the European theatre, where surprise was more often valued, reinforcement far more likely, and ships' guns were responding to the movements of mobile defenders, not whittling away at static fortifications. The heavy-calibre guns of some eighteen battleships and cruisers were used to stop German Panzer counterattacks at Salerno.

Naval gunfire was used extensively throughout Normandy , although initially the surprise nature of the landings themselves precluded a drawn-out bombardment which could have reduced the Atlantic Wall defences sufficiently, a process that fell to specialist armoured vehicles instead. Naval gunfire support played a critical role in the Korean War ; the conflict was ideal for this type of service, with much of the fighting taking place along the coast of the Korean Peninsula.

In particular were so-called "Trainbuster" patrols, working with spotter aircraft to destroy North Korean supply trains, as well as railway bridges and tunnels. In the Indian annexation of Goa naval gunfire support was provided by the Indian Navy 's cruisers, destroyers and frigates in support of Indian Army Operations.

Task Unit If greater firepower was required then larger gunned cruisers were called in for reinforcements, along with the battleship USS New Jersey for a single tour of duty. In the actions in Lebanon, fire support was provided on several occasions by destroyers, cruisers, and New Jersey assigned to coastal patrol. This was the last firing of battleship guns during war, as well as the first use of drone aircraft to observe targets and give targeting corrections.

Naval gunfire is still used for many of its traditional purposes. ANGLICO members are temporarily assigned to combat units of the United States and foreign nations that lack inherent fire support capability, such as naval gunfire. The ships equipped with the large caliber guns of the early and middle of the 20th century have all been decommissioned. The aircraft carrier and sea to land missile have been used instead. Naval guns used on modern ships are smaller caliber weapons, generally with more advanced targeting systems.

It is unlikely that the large caliber guns will make a return and much of the traditional role of Naval Gunfire has been taken over by naval air power and missiles. Within the U.


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This took on a greater sense of urgency with the removal of the last two battleships from the NVR. Welch, a Colonel in the Army National Guard 's Corps of Engineers analyzed the current capacity for naval gunfire support NGS and made several conclusions based on the progress made since the retirement of the last two Iowa-class battleships.

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Welch's thesis report, which earned the National Defense Universities award for Best Thesis in , estimated that the full force of DD X destroyers needed to replace the decommissioned Iowas would not arrive until — at the earliest, and anotes that the U. Navy had not accurately assessed the capabilities of its large caliber gun ships since The report notes that the Navy has consistently scaled back or outright cancelled programs intended to replace naval gunfire support capacity, in the process making no significant gains for offshore fire support since the retirement of the last Iowa-class battleship in This failure by the navy to meet Congressional mandates to improve naval gunfire support caused a rift with the United States Marine Corps and to a lesser extent the United States Army ; in the case of the former, the concern is great enough that several three and four star generals in the Marine Corps have openly admitted to the press their concern over the absence of any effective ship based gunfire support, and two separate Commandants of the Marine Corps have testified before the Senate Armed Service Committee on the risks faced by the Marines in the absence of any effective naval gunfire support.

With the exception of a few procedures, the controlling principles are quite similar in both land and naval bombardment. While the ground-based FO starts his adjustment mission by saying, "Adjust Fire", the naval gunfire spotter says, "Fire Mission"; from that point on the procedures are almost identical. Shore Fire Control Parties participate in field operations, often with a Marine artillery battery to provide simulated naval gunfire support. When available, Marine spotters will call the fire missions for naval ships undergoing their gunnery qualification tests, to provide both parties the opportunity to practice their skills.

Well-timed salvos provide covering fire for sorties and prevent enemy troops and batteries from effectively using anti-aircraft weapons. Tactics NGFS is classified into two types: direct fire, where the ship has line of sight with the target either visually or through the use of radar , and indirect fire, which, to be accurate, requires an artillery observer to adjust fire. When on the gun line, ships are particularly vulnerable to attack from aircraft coming from a landward direction and.

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Marine Corps maneuver elements. The United States battleship retirement debate was a debate among the United States Navy, Marine Corps, Congress, and independent groups over the effectiveness of naval gunfire support NGFS provided by Iowa class battleships, and whether or not an alternative should be implemented. The debate centered on the best way to provide fire support for amphibious assault and other troops near a shoreline. Many still viewed the battleships as essential. Naval gunfire liaison officers assist infantry in effective utilization of naval gunfire support.

The mission was defined during World War II amphibious warfare, and these personnel remain an important coordination point for effective utilization of naval guns by troops ashore. Naval gunfire support was the second of six major elements of the manual. The Gallipoli Campaign had revealed fundamental difficulties in using shipboard guns for troop support. The trajectory of high velocity naval artillery was significantly different from field artillery howitzers typically used for gunfire support.

Infantry o. The unit provides Fire Support Teams FST - formerly called Forward Observation parties to control and co-ordinate Naval fires[1] naval gunfire support, naval air delivered guided and unguided munitions from Royal Navy and allied ships, land based air delivered munitions and artillery fire from the gun batteries of 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery, when ashore in support of 3 Commando Brigade. In support of this role, the battery provides FSTs to the Royal Navy when conducting training on a variety of gunnery ranges around the world.

All personnel withi. In the Turret, a vignette depicting naval artillery by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing c. Naval artillery is artillery mounted on a warship, originally used only for naval warfare, later also for shore bombardment and for anti-aircraft use. The term generally refers to tube-launched projectile-firing weapons and excludes self-propelled projectiles like torpedoes, rockets, and missiles and those simply dropped overboard like depth charges and naval mines.

Origins The Battle of Arnemuiden saw the first use of artillery on board ships. The idea of ship-borne artillery dates back to the classical era. Julius Caesar indicates the use of ship-borne catapults against Britons ashore in his Commentarii de Bello Gallico. The dromons of the Byzantine Empire carried catapults and fire-throwers.

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From the late Middle Ages onwards, warships began to carry cannon of various calibres. Fire support is defined by the United States Department of Defense as "Fires that directly support land, maritime, amphibious, and special operations forces to engage enemy forces, combat formations, and facilities in pursuit of tactical and operational objectives. Warships, for example, have long provided naval gunfire support.

Artillery observers allow adjusting fire. Fire support has been used since the advent of cannons in warfare as artillery. Fire support, as an extension, is the marriage of artillery to the forces in contact. It is the direct ability to properly use artillery. It is distinct from direct fire, which is provided by the forces in contact.

A total of six of the systems have been installed, two on each of the three Zumwalt-class ships. The Navy has no plans for additional Zumwalt-class ships,[2][3] and no plans to deploy AGS on any other ship. AGS can only use ammunition designed specifically for the system. Battleship proponents argued that the battleships should not be decommissioned until an alt. Danish artillery observer using a thermal imaging camera and a laser rangefinder in a live fire exercise A military artillery observer, spotter or FO forward observer is responsible for directing artillery and mortar fire onto a target and may be a Forward Air Controller FAC for close air support and spotter for naval gunfire support.

Spotters ensure that indirect fire hits targets which the troops at the fire support base cannot see. Because artillery is an indirect fire weapon system, the guns are rarely in line-of-sight of their target, often located miles away. More recently a mission controller for an Army Unmanned Air System UAS may also perform this function, and some armies use special artillery patrols behind the enemy's forwa.

The Zumwalts were designed as multi-mission surface combatants tailored for advanced land attack and littoral dominance with a mission of providing credible, independent forward presence and deterrence and operating as integral parts of naval, joint or combined maritime forces.

Because the AGS is currently unusable due to a suspension of its ammunition development program, they cannot provide naval gunfire support[7] and their mission is now surface warfare. Development started in and progressed until specifications and blueprints were largely finished. In it was decided that Sweden would not be buying the AMOS mortar system, and the project was cancelled. Forward observers in the U. Army and Fire Support Men in the U. Marine Corps.

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Army Forward Observers in the U. Army hold the Military Occupational Specialty of 13F for enlisted and 13A for officers designating them as members of the Field Artillery corps.

Annotated Bibliography of Naval Gunfire Support.

After completion of Basic Military Training enlisted soldiers attend a ten-week course on the fundamentals of Call-For-Fire techniques as well as general field craft and small unit tactics at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. The compactness of the gun feeding system makes possible the installation on narrow section crafts. Modular automatic feeding magazines allow the firing of up to four different and immediately selectable types of ammunition; the magazines four drums, each with one shell ready to fire and 13 other ammunitions on store can be reloaded while the mount is in operation.

An ammunition manipulator system is available to transport projectiles and propelling charges from the main ammunition store to the feeding magazines, which are automatically reloaded. The squadron was assembled expressly to provide aerial spotting for naval gunfire support during the invasion of Normandy.


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Personnel and aircraft were assembled on 1 June and began flying missions on 6 June The squadron was disbanded when Allied capture of the town of Cherbourg ended naval bombardment responsibilities on 26 June It is thought to be one of the shortest-lived squadrons in the history of United States military aviation.

Faster and more maneuverable fighters were expected to provide more reliable observation of naval gunfire support during the invasion of Norman. Planning for ships to replace the Adelaide-class frigates and restore the capability last exhibited by the Perth-class destroyers began by , initially under acquisition project SEA , which was re-designated SEA Although the designation "Air Warfare Destroyer" is used to describe ships dedicated to the defence of a naval force plus assets ashore from aircraft and missile attack, the planned Australian destroyers are expected to also operate in anti-surface, anti-submarine, and naval gunfire support roles.

Planning for the Australian Air Warfare Destroyer as the class was known until continued through the mids, with the selection of the Aegis combat system as the intended combat system and ASC as the primary shipbuilder in Between and. It has an estimated strength of 24, active service personnel, including the 7,strong Philippine Marine Corps. Mission "To organize, train, equip, maintain, develop and deploy forces for prompt and sustained naval and maritime operations in support of the Unified Commands in the accomplishment of the AFP mission".

The most prevalent version of the logo shows the silhouette of a Vietnamese Junk with the flag of the Republic of Vietnam in background. Throughout the War in Vietnam, the Seventh Fleet engaged in combat operations against enemy forces through attack carrier air strikes, naval gunfire support, amphibious operations, patrol and reconnaissance operations and mine warfare. Naval operations US Naval forces had been introduced intermittently off the coast of Vietnam since March as "show the flag" tours to reinforce the Republic of Vietnam.

Reconnaissance flights were conducted by these carriers, although no combat missions had started. The Soviets had assisted the Vietnamese in the construction of more sophisticated anti-aircraft installations. The Navy sought to bring electronic warfare "DeSoto miss. The regiment is under the operational control of 3 Commando Brigade, to which it provides artillery support and gunnery observation.

History The regiment was established in by the redesignation of the 25th Field Regiment. At that time, each battery consisted of four mm pack howitzers Italian Mountain Gun. USS John R. She was sunk as a target in June John R. She was launched on 14 April by Mrs. After shakedown in Caribbean John R.

The destroyer returned San Diego on 31 January In the years prior to the Korean co. The Zumwalt-class destroyer is a class of United States Navy guided missile destroyers designed as multi-mission stealth ships with a focus on land attack. It is a multi-role class that was designed for secondary roles of surface warfare and anti-aircraft warfare and originally designed with a primary role of naval gunfire support. It was intended to take the place of battleships in meeting a congressional mandate for naval fire support.

These ships are classed as destroyers, but they are much larger than any other active destroyer or cruiser. In the Atlantic, he commanded the destroyers which provided the first American escort assistance to allied convoys to England just prior to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. He later commanded naval gunfire support at Utah Beach in the Normandy invasion, Task Force at the Bombardment of Cherbourg, as well as during the invasion of Southern France.

When transferred to the Pacific, Rear Admiral Deyo assumed com. The Iowa class was a class of six fast battleships ordered by the United States Navy in and Four vessels, Iowa, New Jersey, Missouri, and Wisconsin, were completed; two more, Illinois and Kentucky, were laid down but canceled in and respectively, and both hulls were scrapped in — The four Iowa-class ships were the last battleships commissioned in the US Navy.

Between the mids and the early s, the Iowa-class battleships fought in four major US wars. Tobin; and commissioned 30 June , Captain J. Carson in command. The ship participated in the attack on Truk,. This would prevent an ecological disaster similar to the Gulf War and enable a quicker resumption of oil exports which was vital to the rebuilding of Iraq after the war. The British Royal Marines' 3 Commando Brigade would also capture Umm Qasr at the same time so that its port, the only deep water port in Iraq, could be used to bring in humanitarian supplies once the Khawr Abd Allah waterway was cleared by the Mine Counter Measures Task group.

The ship was launched on 18 May and commissioned on 12 March When the United States formally entered World War II in , Texas escorted war convoys across the Atlantic and later shelled Axis-held beaches for the North African campaign and the Normandy Landings before being transferred to the Pacific Theater late in to provide naval gunfire support during the Battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Texas was decommissioned in , having earned a total of five battle stars for service in World War II, and is now a museum ship near Houston, Texas.

In addition to her combat service, Texas also served as a technological testbed during her career, and in this capacity became the first US battleship to. The U. This class is among the largest warships to be designed and built in India. Delhi is the second vessel of the Indian Navy to bear the name. She had an illustrious career in the Portuguese-Indian War of , during the annexation of Goa, Daman and Diu when she provided naval gunfire support.